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Pharaoh Hophra | Apries Wahibre
Jeremiah 44:30 I will give Pharaoh Hophra king of Egypt into the hand of his enemies.
 
Pharoah Hophra
Kneeling statue of Wahibre offering a shrine From near Lake Mareotis in the north-west Delta, Egypt. British Museum
 
Egyptian relief fragment from the 26th Dynasty reign of Apries (598-570 B.C.). It was customary for Pharaohs to place their name on all of their buildings.
Egyptian relief fragment from the 26th Dynasty reign of Apries (598-570 B.C.). It was customary for Pharaoh's to place their name on all of their buildings.
 
Egyptian relief fragment from the 26th Dynasty reign of Apries (598-570 B.C.). It was customary for Pharaohs to place their name on all of their buildings.
Faded (blue) faience handle for sistrum on mirror, with 2 vertical columns of the cartouches of Apries. Petrie Museum.
 
Cuneiform tablet with part of the Babylonian Chronicle. British Museum.
Cuneiform tablet with part of the Babylonian Chronicle. British Museum.

 
History
The King commonly referred to as Apries (his Greek name), who's birth name was Wah-ib-re, meaning "Constant is the Heart of Re". Apries, sixth was the king of the Saite Dynasty and spent much of his reign at war with the Babylonian ruler Nebuchadnezzar. Much of this struggle was fought first in the Levant but also at Cyrene in Libya. After suffering huge losses at the Battle of Cyrene, the Egyptian army under Amasis revolted and Apries was forced to flee.

Names
Greek - Apries | Hebrew - Hophra | Egyptian - Wahibre

Apries is the name by which Herodotus (ii. 161) and Diodorus (i. 68) designate Wahibre, Pharaoh-Hophra - Jeremiah 44:30.
 
 

Herodotus Mentions Apries-Hophra and The City of Memphis
"So when Apries leading his foreign mercenaries, and Amasis at the head of the army of Egyptians, in their approach to one another had reached the city of Memphis, they engaged in battle".
- Herodotus Histories Book II

Hosea 9:6 For, lo, they are gone because of destruction: Egypt shall gather them up, Memphis shall bury them: the pleasant places for their silver, nettles shall possess them: thorns shall be in their tabernacles.

 
 

Palace of Apries at Memphis
More recently, in 1909, in the course of excavations carried on by the British School of Archaeology in Egypt, the palace of King Apries, Pharaoh Hophra, has been discovered on the site of Memphis, the ancient capital of Egypt. Under the gray mud hill, close to the squalid Arab village of Mitrahenny, which every tourist passes on the way to Sakkhara, had lain for centuries Hophra's magnificent palace, 400 ft. long by 200 ft., with a splendid pylon, an immense court, and stonelined halls, of which seven have been found intact. With many other objects of value there was found a fitting of a palanquin of solid silver, decorated with a bust of Hathor with a gold face. It is said to be of the finest workmanship of the time of Apries-Hophra, a relic of the fire, which, Jeremiah predicted at Tahpanhes, the Lord of Hosts was to kindle "in the houses of the gods of Egypt" (Jeremiah 43:12).

The main palace building was excavated in two seasons between 1908 and 1910. It is located on a massive artificial platform. Most of the walls of the palace are constructed in mud-brick, while important elements such as columns, pavements and wall cladding (at least to a certain height) are of limestone. Some of the capitals of the columns still bore the name of king Apries, who was therefore most likely the builder of main parts of the complex.

 
 

King Zedekiah and the Babylonian Chronicle
King Zedekiah is in this same chapter and verse of Jeremiah that the Pharaoh Apries-Hophra is mentioned. We are going to compare the record of the Babylonian chronicle clay tablet, as translated into English by scholars, with the account recorded in the Bible. This tablet resides in the British Museum.

"He installed in his place a king Zedekiah of his own choice, and after he had received rich tribute, he sent them forth to Babylon."
- Babylonian Chronicle

"I gave Zedekiah king of Judah into the hand of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon" - Jeremiah 44:30

This chronicle names all of the following people and all of them are in the Bible! - Jehoiachin - Zedekiah - Pharaoh Necho - Nebuchadnezzar