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King Esarhaddon
Ezra 4:2 - The days of Esarhaddon King of Assur
 
Plaque of Esarhaddon
Plaque of King Esarhaddon and the Queen Mother Nakija
Assyrian Empire, reign of Esarhaddon (681-669 BC)
Musée du Louvre.
 
Prism of Esarhaddon
Stone prism of Esarhaddon. Neo-Assyrian, 680-669 BC
From Mesopotamia. British Museum.
 
Esarhaddon Inscription
Stone lion's head that bears a worn inscription naming the Assyrian king Esarhaddon (680-669 BC) and his father Sennacherib. British Museum.
 
 
 
 
History
Esarhaddon was a king of Assyria who reigned 681 BC-669 BC), the youngest son of Sennacherib and the Aramaic queen Naqi'a (Zakitu), Sennacherib's second wife.
 

Plaque of King Esarhaddon and the Queen Mother Nakija
This relief (pictured on the left) belonged to a monument that was probably erected in Babylon. It depicts King Esarhaddon, followed by his mother Queen Nakija, the wife of Sennacherib. The text commemorates the return of the statue of the god Ea to the temple of his son Marduk, the great god of Babylon. Sennacherib had burnt and razed Babylon. In the first year of his rule, his son Esarhaddon rebuilt the holy city, under the influence of the queen mother, who was keen to have her native city restored.
 
 
Esarhaddon Stone Lion's Head
This lion's head (pictured on the left) of white limestone comes from the Temple of Shamash. Known as the Ebabbar ('Shining Temple'), it was one of the most important traditional and prestigious religious centres in Mesopotamia. Rulers sent offerings to Shamash and there are records of numerous kings restoring and rebuilding the temple.

This head, which was originally inlaid, bears a worn inscription naming the Assyrian king Esarhaddon (680-669 BC) and his father Sennacherib. It is not clear, therefore, whether this is a Babylonian or an Assyrian piece. Esarhaddon was responsible for restoring the capital city of Babylon following its destruction by Sennacherib in 689 BC.

Lions were regularly represented in Mesopotamian art on wall reliefs and as elements of furniture. The lion represented the power of nature and is often associated with the king, as it was his duty to defeat the forces of nature that the lion represented.

 
 
Esarhaddon Chronicle
This chronicle is part of a group of documents known as the Babylonian Chronicles which recorded major events in the history of Babylon. Almost all of the ancient tablets are in the possession of the British Museum. The Esarhaddon Chronicle not only contains the name of this Assyrian king Esarhaddon, but it also includes the names and titles for Sennacherib, Tirhakah and Necho. These four kings are all found in the bible.

“The first year of the reign of Esarhaddon.”
“For eight years under Sennacherib, for twelve years under Esarhaddon” - Esarhaddon Chronicle

 
 

Esarhaddon Prism
The ruins of Kuyundshik yielded more inscriptions from Esarhaddon which are now stored in the British Museum:

"I gathered together the kings of Syria and the kings from across the sea, Baal the King of Tyre, Mennaseh the King of Judah"
– Esarhaddon Prism

“The majesty of my sovereignty overwhelmed Hezekiah
– Esarhaddon Prism

Mannaseh and Hezekiah were both kings of Israel according to the biblical record.

 
 

Scriptures
2 Kings 19:37 And it came to pass, as he was worshipping in the house of Nisroch his god, that Adrammelech and Sharezer his sons smote him with the sword: and they escaped into the land of Armenia. And Esarhaddon his son reigned in his stead.

Ezra 4:2 Then they came to Zerubbabel, and to the chief of the fathers, and said unto them, Let us build with you: for we seek your God, as ye do; and we do sacrifice unto him since the days of Esarhaddon King of Assur, which brought us up hither.

Isaiah 37:38 And it came to pass, as he was worshipping in the house of Nisroch his god, that Adrammelech and Sharezer his sons smote him with the sword; and they escaped into the land of Armenia: and Esarhaddon his son reigned in his stead.